Category: Science & Beauty

Nail polish is becoming more popular by the nanosecond and people of all ages are flocking to get their nails painted in the latest styles, colors, gels, patterns, prints, stick-ons, etc.

 However, as we’ve previously discussed, the beauty industry’s first concern is not safety…sad to say. But, the good news is that many new companies are cropping up that ARE interested in safety—in fact their motto is the same as physicians: “first, do no harm.” As a result, they are watching the chemicals they put in their products.

 There are five main chemicals that you do NOT want in your nail polish. These are potentially dangerous and can cause severe nose bleeds, dizziness, headaches and rashes and need to be avoided. They include:

  1. Dibutyl phthalate

  2. Formaldehyde

  3. Formaldehyde resin

  4. Toulene

  5. Camphor

 

 So you have two choices:

  1. Make your own nail polishes (which is what I will be discussing next week)

  2. Find a company(s) that manufactures safe nail polishes (think “green”).

Today I want to talk about a company that produces nail polish that will not harm your health. It is called, “Nailing Hollywood” and was started by celebrity nail stylist Jenna Hipp. Because of her own traumatizing experiences with nail polishes (severe nose bleeds, headaches, dizziness, etc), she decided to start her own company which includes the avoidance of the five dangerous chemicals just mentioned. Her collection has been very successful. In 2012 she earned several awards including the Genius Award from Elle magazine and best in beauty awards from Nylon and Essence magazines.

 

 In 2013, Hipp partnered with Costco and became part of the Beauty’s Most Wanted campaign, launching her five-free “What’s Hot Now Nail Collections” in Costco’s around the country. Her latest additions to the collections are “The New Brights” and “The New Moderns.” Jenna Hipp 4

 Hipp’s company, “Nailing Hollywood,” represents the industry’s top talent among nail stylists specializing in celebrities, editorial fashion, advertising and product development. Some of their clients include: Miley Cyrus, Lady Gaga, Kesha, Michele Williams, Demi Lovato, Drew Barrymore and Jennifer Garner.

Here is some contact information regarding Jenna Hipp’s company:

Company: Nailing Hollywood Management, Inc

Owner: Jenna Hipp

Address: 905 Cole Ave.Los Angeles, CA 90038

Email: info@beautysmostwanted.com

Website: www.jennahipp.com, beautysmostwanted.com

Instagram: @jennahipp, @nailinghollywood, @beautysmostwanted

 

Have any of you ever tried Jenna Hipp nail polishes? If so, I would love to hear from you—how you like them and how well they last.

Last, I must say that her nail colors and style to me reflect something a bit more sophisticated than most nail polishes and nail style presentations that I’ve seen. To be quite frank, they remind me of the classy elegance found in classical music. So, while you are getting your nails done with Jenna Hipp nail polish, or while you are polishing your own nails, put on some classical music (see the Resource Section of my book, Good Music Brighter Children for suggestions) and see if your nails don’t reflect more elegance and sophistication, too!

Enjoy!

Sharlene 2014


A couple of weeks ago, I discussed what are referred to as “Red Alert” ingredients found in skincare products. Today we are discussing what the  Environmental Working Group (EWG) considers “Yellow Alert” ingredients found in your cosmetic and skincare products. So, take out a sheet of yellow paper to put your “yellow alert” products on and grab your bundle of cosmetics and let our work begin!

 Some of the following five chemicals can create the formation of carcinogenic chemicals called nitrosamines and are considered harmful:

 1. Cocamide DEH

 2. Lauramide DEA

 3. Cocamide MEA

 4. Triethanolamine (TEA)

 5. Diethanolamine (DEA)

 

Here are other chemicals that are considered Yellow Alert:

 1.Mineral Oils: they coat the skin like plastic, so it cannot breathe. They slow down the skin’s natural function and cell development, resulting in premature aging. They can also be contaminated with PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) which can be carcinogenic. They can be found in mascara. It appears on the label reading, “Petroleum” or Liquid Paraffin.”

 2Parabens (methyl, ethyl, propyl, butyl, isobutyl): These are chemical preservatives that have been identified as estrogenic disruptive of normal hormone function. These will increase the risk of breast cancer.

3. Phthalates: cause a broad range of birth defects and lifelong reproductive impairment in lab animals. They are hormone-mimicking chemicals and have raised concern for increased breast cancer risk. They are often hidden under the term, “fragrance.” Dibutyl and diethylhexyl have been banned in Europe but not in the United States

 

 4. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS), Sodium Lauryl Ether Sulfate (SLES). This is a foaming agent derived from coconut oil. (btw: coconut oil itself is wonderful, this is not).  It is found in a huge variety of skin care products including toothpaste, shampoo, bubble bath, soap. The EWG considers it to be a carcinogen. Others say it is prone to contamination by 1,4-dioxane.

 5. Polyethylene Glycol (PEG): PEG is a potential carcinogen that is used as a grease-dissolving cleaner and a thickener for skincare products. These chemicals are considered so toxic by the EWG that workers have to use protective clothing when handling these items. They can cause brain, liver and kidney malfunctions. Also, watch for any others in the glycol family: propylene glycol, isopropyl alcohol, butylenes glycol.

 

 6. Formaldehyde-Producing Preservatives: some preservatives are formaldehyde donors in that they lease small amounts of formaldehyde into the skin. Formaldehyde can cause many health issues including joint discomfort, chest pains, and chronic fatigue. Examples: hydantoin, imidazolidinyl urea, diazolidinyl urea

 7. Talc: found in baby products, underarm deodorants and cosmetic powder products. Talc contains a chemical that is similar to asbestos and can increase the risk of certain ovarian cancers

 

 8. Acrylates & Methacrylates: found in nail products, these products can cause contact dermatitis.

 9. Alcohol, Isopropyl (SD-40): This is a common additive in cosmetics. It is a drying agent that strips off the outer layers of skin, exposing you to bacteria and other toxins. It can also promote brown spots and aging.

 10. Tocopherol Acetate: it is a synthetic version of vitamin E and is a suspected carcinogen and causes dermatitis.

 11. Phenonip: a preservative that contains parabens

 12. Quaternayr Ammonium Compounds (Quats): They are used as preservatives and are the primary cause of contact dermatitis. They will listed as: benzalkonium chloride, cetrimonium bromide, quaternium-15, and quaternium 1-29

 13. Cationic Surfactants: Found in hair conditioners. Can make your hair dry and brittle after long-term use. They are allergenic and toxic. They are listed as: stearalkonium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, cetrimonium chloride, cetalkonium chloride and lauryl dimonium hydrolyzed collagen.

 14. Benzyl Alcohol: it is a petro-chemical that can be a severe eye irritant and respiratory system.

 

 15. Silicone Derived Emollients: coat the skin like plastic wrap and can accumulate in the liver and lymph nodes, which can promote tumor growth. They include: dimethicone, dimethicone copolyol and cyclomethicone.

 16. Carbomer 934, 940, 941, 961C: this is used as a stabilizer and thickener in creams, cosmetics, toothpastes and bath products. It is a known allergen that causes eye irritation.

 NOTE: If you are ever in doubt, go to this website: www.safecosmetics.org.  It is from a company called Safe Cosmetics and you can go here and get the safety scoop on any product you are concerned about.

 You can also go to: www.scorecard.org and click on “Chemical Profiles.” You can check your air, water, home, and general environment for toxic concerns. You can see how your area stacks up toxicity-wise against every other area in the US.

Last, you can read about this and more in the book, “Gorgeously Green.”

Good luck!

Sharlene 2014


Today I want to talk about something fun, easy and inexpensive to make—scrubs!

 Here are some basic rules for exfoliating your skin.

 First: Don’t listen to the advertisements telling you to exfoliate every day—they are trying to sell you a product and will tell you anything—and this includes what skincare professionals may tell you.

 Second: How many times a week you exfoliate your skin depends on how old you are. If you are fifty years old and above then cell turnover takes longer and you probably should only exfoliate maybe once every week or two. Younger people should exfoliate maybe twice a week. Exfoliating every day is not a good idea; you can tear the skin, upbraid the skin and can cause damage to your skin. Why? Because most people are way too harsh when using scrubs on their skin and actually damage the skin.

 Third: do NOT use scrubs with microbeads in them or scrubs containing polyethylene or polypropylene on the ingredient label. They are plastic and after you wash them off your skin, they go down the drain, and cause serious environmental issues. In fact, there is legislation in most states to ban the sale and manufacture of soap and cosmetics containing microbeads. Don’t use the alternatives either—acids—not good (more on this later).

 Fourth: Bottom line—you do not need an expensive scrub filled with ingredients you cannot pronounce. Just open your cupboard and you will find things that work even better than the store-bought brands plus your cupboard contains ingredients that are safer and less expensive.

 Here are some recipes. These are considered “gommage” scrubs; they are not dangerous, they do the job and they cost pennies to make.

 Gentle Facial Exfoliate

½ cup ground oatmeal (grind in the blender)

¼ cup powdered milk, whole or nonfat

1 teaspoon cornmeal

Distilled or Purified water to make a paste

Directions:

In a small bowl, thoroughly blend all dry ingredients using a spoon. Put in container until ready to use.

 To mix the scrub:

Combine 4 tablespoons of scrub mixture with enough water to form a spreadable paste. Allow the mixture to thicken for 1 minute. Using your fingertips, massage scrub onto the face and neck in a gentle circular fashion. Rinse with cool water.

 

 Exfoliating Foot Mask recipe

1/2 cup oatmeal—ground in a blender
1/2 cup cornmeal
1/2 cup coarse salt
1/4 cup unscented body lotion
1 tablespoon aloe vera gel (optional)

Directions:  

In a large bowl, combine dry ingredients. For each treatment use ½ cup of the dry ingredients & mix with the wet ingredients. Rub on toes, working up to heels and ankles. One foot at a time—rinse in warm water.

Cinnamon Complexion Scrub:

 I read this recipe in the Los Angeles Times. It was developed by Ole Henriksen of Ole Henriksen Face/Body Spa in West Hollywood. This mixture will keep in the refrigerator and is enough for several applications. Use it on clean skin.

Ingredients:

½ ounce of ground cinnamon

½ ounce of brown sugar

½ ounce powdered oatmeal (I use quick oats and blend them to a fine powder in the blender)

¼ ounce of table salt

6 drops of lavender essential oil (you can use the essential oils from Majestic Mountain Sage)

Avocado oil: add enough to make it a smooth paste with a dense texture

 Directions:

  • Mix ingredients together, adding the avocado oil last. Use enough avocado oil to make a smooth paste with a dense texture that will smooth across your face.

  • To apply, blend between damp palms, transfer onto your face, work into skin in an upward circular motion

  • Work into every crevice of face—especially the T-zone, which is more prone to clogged pores.

  • Rinse well with warm water and follow with your skincare routine and product.

You can purchase a scale to use to measure this scrub at Majestic Mountain Sage—that is where I purchased mine.

 

Now for my favorite scrub: Lemon Scrub (use this in the shower)

Natural Lemon Body Exfoliate

 Ingredients:

1 ½ cups fine granulated sugar

Juice of ½ lemon

 Directions:

Mix ½ cup of the sugar and lemon juice to form a paste. While you are in the shower, use as a body scrub on your skin. Use the inside of the lemon rind and rub on your heels and elbows. This is an amazing scrub! Make certain you use it in the shower—it can get sticky but it smells wonderful!

Enjoy!

Sharlene 2014

 

 

 


How many of you before purchasing a skincare or cosmetic product actually turn the bottle or jar over and read the fine print? Did you know that the FDA requires that every product sold over the counter has a label with ingredients listed in descending order according to the quantity of the ingredient found in the bottle? And yes, I know the writing is usually microscopic, and you may need to carry a magnifying glass to be able to see it, but it is important that you understand what ingredients are lurking in those fancy bottles with the chi-chi packaging. So keep reading…

 

**First: not all ingredients are safe.

 **Second: as I told you before, 60 percent of what you put on your body finds its’ way into your blood stream.

**Third: over time a steady onslaught of bad ingredients can cause health issues that you may/may not even connect to unsafe ingredients found in your cosmetic bag. It is called the Threshold Principle.

 

 So, let’s take a look at what is lurking in your cupboards and drawers.

 Take out a red piece of paper—yes red. Today we are going to talk about the worst of the worst—the Red Alert ingredients. These are ones you need to chuck—yes dump them in the garbage. Your health may depend on it. If after going through this list you realize that most of your skincare and cosmetic products contain one of more of these ingredients and you simply cannot part with them despite the warnings, I have a little tip at the end—so keep reading.

 The information below comes from the book, “Gorgeously Green,” and The Environmental Working Group (EWG) website.

 The Environmental Working Group suggests that consumers should be on high alert for the following seven ingredients. They are listed in order of danger significance:

 Red Alert Ingredients:

Coal tar: used in dandruff shampoos and anti-itch creams. Coal tar is a known carcinogen. Coal tar-based dyes such as FD&C Blue1, which are used in toothpastes, and FD&C Green 3, which is used in mouthwash, should be avoided

 Fragrance: this ubiquitous term is used to mask hundreds of ingredients, including phthalates, which disrupt the endocrine system and could cause reproductive and developmental harm.

 

 Hydroquinone: Commonly found in skin lighteners and facial moisturizers, it is a neurotoxin and is allergic.

 Aluminum: often found in eye shadow as a color additive and also used in deodorants, it is listed as carcinogenic, toxic and mutagenic. It is found in most deodorants—and can go into the blood stream, pass the blood brain barrier and cause problems—like Alzheimer’s.

 Triclosan: this chemical is used in almost all antibacterial products, including soap, toothpaste, and cosmetics. Triclosan is often contaminated with dioxins, which are highly carcinogenic and can also weaken you immune system, decrease fertility and cause birth defects.

 

 P-Phenylenediamine: This is the chemical that has given a bad name to regular hair dye. It can damage your nervous system, cause lung irritation, and cause severe allergic reactions. It’s also listed as 1,4-Benzenediamine; p-Phenyldiamine and 4-Phenylenediamine.

 Lead and Mercury: Lead could appear in toothpaste as a naturally occurring contaminant of hydrated silica. It is a neurotoxin that also appears as lead acetate in men’s hair dye. Mercury is found in a cosmetic preservative called thimerosol.

 

A little tip:

Okay, at this point if you really are concerned with long-term health, your garbage can should be overflowing with red-alert cosmetics, etc.

And you are probably upset that the some of the products that you absolutely LOVE are filled with various forms of slow-killing poisons.

And you are probably thinking this whole exercise is either exaggerated or incorrect. Right? I mean after all, isn’t the FDA the final word on everything? Don’t they want to keep you healthy? It is an arm of the government, after all.

If think that, you are living in a fool’s paradise. Remember, I told you only 1% of the FDA’s budget goes to regulating the beauty industry. In other words, no one is regulating this industry.

So, if you refuse to get rid of anything—fine, but you will need to do something to keep your immune system high. So, start taking coconut oil—about 1 Tablespoon each day. No, you are not going to get fat from coconut oil—it is a medium-chain fatty acid and is actually amazing for your endocrine system and for your immune system (which if found in your gut). So, keep that in mind. If you have a Costco card—they carry coconut oil.

Last, if you are young and healthy I doubt seriously that you will throw away any of your red-alert skincare or cosmetic products and I also doubt seriously that you will take the coconut oil and I also think you will continue to purchase products based on packaging and what your friends tell you. So, do yourself a favor. Keep this blog handy because at some point in the future if you continue putting on products that pose a potential threat to your health, there is a good chance you are going to get sick–then you might listen…

Good Luck!

Sharlene 2014

 


Today I want to introduce you to something that is really fun to make—lip balms.

 I order all my equipment from Majestic Mountain Sage. They are a full-service company that supplies both the cosmetic industry and soapmakers. As you will see from their website—they offer many different ingredients, chemicals, molds, etc to make things like soaps, lip balms, scrubs, fragrances, etc. Once you start cruising their website, you will be hooked!

Here are the ingredients and items you will need:

Lip Balm Tray they come in regular, oval, slim stick, depending on what shape of lip balm you want. Do not try and do this project without a lip balm tray—it makes the task difficult and the cost is extremely reasonable.  (Cost: $13.50/tray)

Lip Balm Tubes: I like the clear with the white bottom tube, but they also come in black and in different sizes. (Cost: 10 pack: $3.00, 100 pack: $11.00)

Lip Balm Caps (clear) (Cost: 10 pack: $1.00, 100 pack: $5.00)

Don’t forget these! They have a variety of colorful caps—so depending on the occasion and what you are doing, you may want to experiment with different colors.

Lip Solutions: (look under “Bases” on their website). Lip Solutions come in a variety of flavors (Mango, Shea Butter, Soy Lip, Vegan Lip) and each jar makes about 50-55 tubes of lip balm.  (Cost per jar: $8.00)

 Other options: if you want to make larger lip balms, they offer larger tubes. Also, they have really nice tins and little jars for lip balms as well. Have fun and experiment with all of them—you will become a pro!

 Some of their lip solutions are already pre-made so all you have to do is melt the solution in the microwave and pour into the tubes that you have attached to the tray. However, if you want to make your solutions from scratch, they carry all the ingredients you will need to make your own. My suggestion: try their solutions first and then try creating your own. If you decide to make your own there are literally hundreds of recipes out there, but a word of caution—stay away from recipes that include Vaseline—also known as petroleum jelly—it is not a great ingredient.

 Directions for making lip balms:

(pictures courtesy of Majestic Mountain Sage)

Gently screw the lip balm tubes into the Lip Balm Tray

Lip Balm Tutor   Lip Balm Tutor 1

Melt the lip solution in the microwave—it is not necessary to melt the whole jar—but any “leftovers” can be put back into the jar and re-used another time

Pour the melted lip solution into the tubes. Let them completely set (about 20 minutes).  I would not try to speed up the process by putting them into the refrigerator because you can get fractionation.

Lip Balm Tutor 2

After the balms are completely cooled, take a scraper and with one clean swoop, take off the excess solution and put back into the jar.

Lip Balm Tutor 3

Gently pull the tubes straight down so it will make a nice rounded top

Lip Balm Tutor 5

Put on the caps

lip balm

 You can also download their tutorial that comes with pictures and step-by-step directions: “How to use the PlasticTom Lip Balm Filling Trays” Click here for the Plastic Tom Tutorial.

 If you are feeling really creative, create your own labels and even boxes (primary and secondary packaging). These can be used as part of a gift basket or tucked into a decorative bag.

Enjoy!

Sharlene 2014

(These photos were taken from the Majestic Mountain Sage Website and are used by permission).

 

 


Hi Everyone!

Today I want to introduce you to some easy-to-make skincare products that you can put together in your kitchen with ingredients that you probably have in your cupboards. The advantage: you are using safe ingredients and ingredients that will NOT harm your skin or your body and in many cases work just as well as the products in the stores.

 Some skincare companies actually had their beginnings in the kitchen with creative and adventurous women experimenting with ingredients they found in their cupboards. For example: Lisa Price of “Carol’s Daughter,” and Josie Maran of “Josie Maran Cosmetics,” both started concocting potients in their kitchens. So, who knows—this might be the beginning of a new business for you! And if not, it may just give you some ideas for gifts for your friends. One of my students told me that she makes her own skincare products for friends and she packages them in cute canning jars complete with a ribbon and directions on how to use. Clever!

 So, today, let’s discuss MASKS!

 Everyone loves a mask; however there are different ones you can make that will do different things for your skin. So try all of these masks at different times. And, btw, you really only need to use a mask once a week

 Brewer’s Yeast Mask

 1 Tablespoon Brewer’s Yeast (Twin Labs Brand—get at Amazon or Vitacost)

2-3 teaspoons of water (or more) to make a paste that is easy to spread over the entire face.

 Directions: Apply to the entire face. It should not be runny, but you don’t want the consistency to be stiff, either—it should spread easily on the face. Let dry completely and then gently with a washcloth and water, rinse it off. This dries quite hard so be careful as you are taking it off and don’t tug at the skin. You may want to loosen it up with a wet washcloth until it becomes easier to take it off.

 What You Should Know about Brewer’s Yeast:

 Brewer’s Yeast is a by-product of beer. It is totally non-alcoholic, and in the “olden days,” it was the by-product of beer that was discarded and given to the animals. It was not until someone noticed that the animals’ skin and fur was healthy and thick that they decided to look into this “discarded” substance and found it to be pretty incredible. It is high in all the B vitamins, high in chromium (a very important mineral) and was very high in protein—44%! It also has what is referred to as a “skin respiratory factor,” meaning that it can actually heal the skin.

 You can take a tablespoon of it and mix with water to form a paste and use it as a spot treatment on your skin for acne conditions or you can use it on your entire face as a tightening mask.  Either way, it is amazing!

 However—a couple of things to watch for: it is high in the B vitamins and some people can experience what is referred to as “niacin flush.” This means that after you take the mask off your face you may have a slight pinking. This is perfectly normal and does no harm to the skin. But I would use this mask at night and not 20 minutes before a date.

 Last, I like the Twin Labs brand because it is a smoother consistency than most of the Brewer’s Yeasts on the market.

 Basic Clay Mask

1 tablespoon white or green or red or pink clay (order from Majestic Mountain Sage online)

½ & ½ Cream—for dry skin (this is found in the dairy section of the grocery store)

Milk—for normal skin

Water—for oily skin

 Directions: When ready to use: In a small bowl, combine 1 tablespoon of the clay with enough of the appropriate liquid to form a smooth paste. Apply: using fingers, spread paste over clean face and allow to dry completely for 20-30 minutes while lying down. The mask will lift and tighten the skin. Rinse with cool water.

 What You Should Know About Clay:

All clay masks gently exfoliate as they tighten, stimulate circulation, re-mineralize and soften skin. This mask is gentle enough to be used by anyone. If mixed with water it makes an excellent overnight pimple treatment. Simply apply a dab to each pimple and leave on while you sleep. The clay absorbs excess oil during the night and aids in the healing of blemishes.

 

 Where to get the Clay: 

I like Majestic Mountain Sage (www.thesage.com) I actually purchase quite a few of their products and I’ll be talking about some of them in the future. They have a wonderful selection of clays—my favorite is the French Green Clay. It is a beautiful green and has a wonderful consistency. The red clay is a Moroccan Clay which is also very nice. My least favorite is the white clay—too drab! So, check out their clays—you will be hooked!

 

Egg White Mask

 1 egg divided (keep the yolk for another mask)

Directions:

 Slightly beat the egg white in a small container. Then spread over the entire face and neck. Lie down with your chin up and let the mask dry completely—about 15 to 20 minutes. Gently rinse off the egg white. You skin should be smooth and soft.

 What You Should Know About Egg White:

 Egg white is very high in protein and it works on the skin similar to how a peptide works on the skin but it does not break down on the skin like a peptide does. Like a peptide, the egg white will tighten the skin and shrink pore size (not permanently, but for about 2 hours). Unlike a peptide, the egg white will not break down on the skin into a weak acid and cause teeny tiny bumps or break-outs. This is why I like egg white over peptides. Plus egg whites are a lot cheaper than an expensive peptide!

 

 Egg Yolk Mask

 1 egg divided (keep the egg white for the mask above)

Directions:

 Slightly beat the yolk in a small container. Spread over the entire face and neck. Lie down with your chin up and let the mask dry completely—about 15 to 20 minutes. Gently rinse off the egg yolk. You skin should be smooth and soft.

 What You Should Know About Egg Yolk: 

 If you have used harsh acids on your skin, then you have removed the protective layer of the skin called the stratum corneum. This layer of the skin is also referred to as the “gatekeeper” of the skin because it is the skin’s anti-aging, anti-wrinkling, and anti-bacterial protection. You need this layer if you want to have a shot at healthy skin. So, stay off the stupid acids! The only way to re-establish this very important layer of the skin is to use an egg yolk mask once a week for about a year.

Enjoy!

Sharlene 2014

 

 

 


Do you ever take a minute to look at the label of the skincare product or cosmetic you are purchasing? (That is-if you can read the teeny-tiny font size!) Well, if you are one of the millions who ignore the labels—you might want to change your approach and start reading—it is important to your health!

“Oh, a few dangerous ingredients aren’t that bad,” you may say. Yes, that is true; however a steady blast of dangerous ingredients slapped on your skin and hair day in and day out can add up and cause what is referred to as the threshold principle. That is when you body has had enough and you have a reaction to something—it can be an allergic reaction or getting sick all of a sudden and not being able to find a cause.

The Environmental Working Group (EWG) suggests that consumers should be on high alert for the following seven ingredients. They are listed in order of danger significance:

**Coal tar: used in dandruff shampoos and anti-itch creams. Coal tar is a known carcinogen. Coal tar-based dyes such as FD&C Blue1, which are used in toothpastes, and FD&C Green 3, which is used in mouthwash, should be avoided

 **Fragrance: this ubiquitous term is used to mask hundreds of ingredients, including phthalates, which disrupt the endocrine system and could cause reproductive and developmental harm.

 **Hydroquinone: Commonly found in skin lighteners and facial moisturizers, it is a neurotoxin and is allergic.

**Aluminum:often found in eye shadow as a color additive and also used in deodorants, it is listed as carcinogenic, toxic and mutagenic.

**Triclosan: this chemical is used in almost all antibacterial products, including liquid soaps, toothpaste, and cosmetics. Triclosan is often contaminated with dioxins, which are highly carcinogenic and can also weaken you immune system, decrease fertility and cause birth defects. Triclosan can also alter your gut bacteria. Just use plain old soap and water—it will sanitize just fine!

**P-Phenylenediamine: This is the chemical that has given a bad name to regular hair dye. It can damage your nervous system, cause lung irritation, and cause severe allergic reactions. It’s also listed as 1,4-Benzenediamine; p-Phenyldiamine and 4-Phenylenediamine.

**Lead and Mercury:Lead could appear in toothpaste as a naturally occurring contaminant of hydrated silica. It is a neurotoxin that also appears as lead acetate in men’s hair dye. Mercury is found in a cosmetic preservative called thimerosol. Thimerosol is also used as a preservative in vaccinations.

 This is just a partial list—there is more to come—but make a copy of this list and put it in your wallet or purse and take it with you when you purchase your next cosmetics or skincare products.

Sharlene 2014


Did you know that facial cleansers can “wear out” your skin quicker than anything else you apply to your skin? It’s true. Ninety percent of skin problems begin with cleansing issues. Why? Because most women use cleansers that are way too harsh for their skin even when the label on the packaging says “for sensitive skin.”

 The biggest culprit in all these cleansers are anionic and cationic surfactants—one of the largest categories of cosmetic chemicals. They include detergents and soaps; they lather lightly and break up oils, fats and other debris. Surfactants either have a negative, positive, or neutral charge and most, by definition, are an irritant to the skin. One example is sodium lauryl sulfate; one of the members of the sulfate family (i.e.: disodium lauryl sulfosuccinate, ammonium lauryl sulfate, alpha-olefin sulfonate, etc).  They are caustic to the skin and an irritant and are not only found in detergents, soaps and cleansers, but also toothpastes.

 Look at your labels—if they contain any of the sulfates—dump them! They will age your skin. The Environmental Working Group (EWG) will give you more data on the sulfate family regarding toxicity, environmental concerns, etc., but just know that SLS is too harsh to use on your skin. Usually after you use a cleanser containing harsh ingredients, your skin feels stripped. You don’t want to strip the oil glands (also called the “sebaceous glands”). You want to stabilize them.

 The kind of cleanser you want is referred to as an amphorteric surfactant that can safely remove dirt, etc and not harm, irritate, strip, or age the skin. An amphorteric surfactant adapts to the pH of the water used in solution and is adaptable to both acid and alkaline water. Their neutrality indicates the mildness of the product.  My favorite amphorteric cleansers are found in the brand: 302 Skincare. They offer many different cleaners and an amazing bar soap. The main ingredient is avocado; in fact in the bar they use the entire avocado—skin, meat and seed!

302

 Last, it is important to keep your skin “surprised” so that it doesn’t get used to any particular product and stop reacting or shut down. And the best way to keep your skin surprised is by trading off and using different cleansers. Mix them up—use two or three different ones—one in the morning and a different one in the evening.

 Using the correct cleanser is the beginning step toward great looking skin!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...